Working to Overcome Barriers: Solutions and Strategies for Health Literacy with Limited English Proficient Residents of NJ

Hank Dalllman,  MA, CMI

This 2-hour workshop will address health literacy for limited English proficient (LEP) Hispanics living in the US, within the context of culturally and linguistically diverse healthcare. The workshop will balance general definitions, trends and background information with specific examples of low health literacy from the Hispanic community and other LEP communities. Participants will learn practices to overcome low health literacy through effective translation and interpreting procedures, as well as more general bilingual communication.  Examples such prescribing medicines will be discussed to illustrate the possible dangers and potential for improvements regarding health literacy for LEP patients and clients.

While discussing health literacy in the context of healthcare, an effort will be made to extrapolate conclusions and solutions into more general area, such as education and social service environments.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe health literacy within the framework of culturally and linguistically diverse healthcare, with a focus on Hispanics in the US.
  • List ways to address health literacy and make health information more effective through translation and interpreting.
  • Identify selective examples of trouble-spots in health literacy
  • Define strengths and challenges that members of the healthcare team face when treating limited English proficiency patients and clients with low health literacy.

Agenda

1:15-2:15pm Defining health literacy
Practices for overcoming low health literacy
Translation/Interpretation services/Bilingual communication
2:15-3:15pm Application of theory to practice
Case examples and Group activities

CEs: 2 Cultural Competence
Level:  Beginner

About the Presenter

Mr. Dallmann is Assistant Professor at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and coordinator of the New Brunswick Community Interpreter Project.  He leads a robust training program for paraprofessional student interpreters and bilingual staff from NJ hospitals and community health centers.  He teaches medical interpreting and translation at Rutgers University.  He has presented on medical interpreting at local and national conferences.

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