Is Allyship Enough? The Interconnected System of Oppression and Privilege and the Role of Allies in Social Justice

Event registration is open ONLY to staff of DMHAS-contracted mental health and/or substance abuse agencies, and self-help centers.

If you have questions regarding your DMHAS-contracting, training details, or requests for accessibility accommodations, please contact at us at 973-323-3454 or FCCultureConnections@familyconnectionsnj.org.

 

December 15,16, 2020

Is Allyship Enough? The Interconnected System of Oppression and Privilege and the Role of Allies in Social Justice

Presented by: Tawanda Hubbard, MSW, DSW, LCSW

Location: Live-interactive webinar, East Orange, NJ

In our society we continue to bear witness to social injustices and inequities experienced by some at different points of intersectionality resulting in dire circumstances and losses.  Some in our society conclude that we have a “fish problem”—outcomes worst for marginalized people because the difficulty is due to their own shortcomings.  The counterargument is we have a “lake problem”—outcomes are worst for people in marginalized status because systems and institutions that shape our lives are designed to perpetuate inequities by keeping power, decision-making and control in the hands of the dominant populations.  In this 3-hour webinar we will look closely at the systems of oppression and privilege and how power operates in our society to advantage some at the expense of others.  Discuss the need for professionals and organizations to adopt an anti-racist and anti-oppressive stance in combating social inequities.  Participants will identify where they stand in relation to allyship, explore if allyship is enough, discuss positionality and motivation, difference between ally, accomplice, and co-conspirators, and list strategies to act in solidarity with targeted groups against interconnected systems of oppression and privilege.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Define oppression and privilege and its historical origins and power in operation within our society.
  2. Define structural and institutional discrimination and discuss whiteness as the norm/standard within our society and institutions.
  3. Discuss the need for antiracist and anti-oppressive stance and expanding perspective—embracing human rights lens.
  4. Define what is an ally and what it looks like in practice.
  5. Discuss the difference between ally, accomplice and co-conspirators and role of emotions and motivation.
  6. Identify where they stand in relation to allyship, their positionality and motivation and list strategies to act in solidarity with targeted groups against interconnected systems of oppression and privilege.

Course Level:          ☐ Beginner        ☒ Intermediate       ☐ Advanced

The course is open to social workers, counselors, substance abuse professionals, and other DMHAS licensed agency staff. Course certificates for 5 Cultural Competence CEs is presented upon completion of the course and evaluation. All courses are free. There are no penalties for cancellation.

Registration for this training opens in November. Deadline is Monday, December 14, 2020.

To register once registration opens, please click here.

 

TRAINING AGENDA:

Time Frame Course Content
12/15/20 Day 1
9:30 – 9:35 am Welcome/Introductions/Objectives of the training/Opening
9:35 – 10:35am §  Discuss oppression and privilege and its historical origins.

§  Discuss power in operation within our society.

(Mini-lectures, interactive discussion, and videos)

10:35-10:50am Break
10:50 -11:35 am §  Define structural and institutional discrimination and discuss whiteness as the norm/standard within our society and institutions.

§  Discuss Black Lives Movement factoring in context and historical perspective and structural discrimination that breeds within our society and institutions.

(Mini-lectures, interactive discussion, and videos)

11:35 – 11:50 pm

 

Break
11:50am – 12:30pm

 

 

§  Discuss the need for antiracist and anti-oppressive stance, impact, and expanding perspective—embracing human rights lens.

§  Define what is an ally and what it looks like in practice at different points of intersectionality.

(Mini-lectures, interactive discussion, reflective exercise, and videos)

12/16/20 Day 2
9:30-9:35am Welcome/Opening/Objectives of the day
9:35 – 10:35 am

 

§  Day 1: Questions and Feedback

§  Discuss the difference between ally, accomplice and co-conspirators and role of emotions and motivations

§  Discuss implicit bias and Microaggression.

 

(Mini-lectures, interactive discussion, reflective exercise, microaggression activity, and videos

10:35 – 10:50 am

 

Break
10:50-11:35am §  Expand one’s perspective–embracing a Human Rights lens.

§  Discuss the need for Anti-racist and Anti-oppressive stance for professionals and organizations.

§  Define intersectionality, social location, and positionality.

11:35am- 11:50pm Break
11:50am-12:35pm §  Listing strategies to act in solidarity with targeted groups against interconnected systems of oppression and privilege.

§  Plus 10-minutes Wrap-up and Questions

 

TRAINER BIO

Dr. Tawanda Hubbard is a social work educator and practitioner. She teaches at her alma mater, Rutgers SSW as a part-time lecturer. She has taught at Rutgers SSW for over 8 years and was honored in 2016 with Outstanding Doctoral Instructor and honored in 2013 and 2014 with Outstanding Adjunct Instructor. Dr. Hubbard is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker with over 15 years of experience in child welfare, behavioral health, adolescent and family therapy, and clinical practice. She currently provides individual, couple and family therapy as a private practitioner and in-community provider, consultant, and clinical supervisor.  Dr. Hubbard is a consultant trainer with NJ Child Welfare Training Partnership, NJ Victims Assistance Academy, and NJ Child Support Institute. She conducts workshops on her scholarship interests (dismantling structural discrimination, anti-racism, oppositionality in adolescents, relational neglect in adolescence, clinical supervision, etc.). Dr. Hubbard is the immediate past President of the NASW, NJ Chapter, former faculty member at Monmouth University School of Social Worker, CSWE Minority Fellowship Doctoral Alumna, serves on Rutgers School of Social Work Alumni Advisory Council and CSWE Minority Fellowship Doctoral Advisory Council.

APPROVALS

Social Workers: We have applied for 5 CE credits for this course through ASWB  ACE.

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