Afternoon Workshop 3

What We Have Learned About Adolescent-Mother Conflicts and Suicide Among Latinas: Tips and Implications for Clinical Services

Carolina Hausmann-Stabile, PhD, LMSW
CEUs: 1 Clinical, 1 Cultural Competence

Description 

Because of the high prevalence of suicidal ideation and behaviors among Latina adolescents, most clinicians will encounter these clients more than once in their careers. This workshop will focus on the influence of adolescent-mother conflict on suicidal behaviors among Latina adolescents and prepare clinicians to provide culturally competent and evidence-based services to adolescent Latina clients who present with deliberately self-injurious behaviors, suicidal ideation or thoughts, suicidal verbalization, intentional self-harm, and/or suicide attempts. Through exposure to the  most recent empirical research in preventing and treating suicidal behavior among Latina adolescents, practitioners will learn to assess self-injurious and suicidal behavior, as well as strategies for addressing the dysfunctional family dynamics that are associated with suicidal behaviors among teens, and assisting Latino families in supporting the adolescent’s mental health treatment.

Learning Objectives

  1. Articulate coherent, evidence-based assessment and intervention strategies for advanced clinical practice with Latino adolescents presenting deliberately self-injurious behaviors, suicidal ideation or thoughts, suicidal verbalization, intentional self-harm, and suicide attempts.
  2. Demonstrate advanced clinical skills related to implementing culturally competent evidence-based interventions for this population.
  3. Articulate advanced understanding of the impact of family dynamics in the practice of clinical work with Latino adolescents and families, and then translate this into suggested tasks for improving clinical practice.

About Carolina Hausmann-Stabile

Carolina Hausmann-Stabile, PhD, LMSW is a Latina researcher and clinician with more than a decade of experience working with Latinos in the U.S. and Latin America. She obtained her PhD at the Brown School of Social Work, at Washington University in St Louis. Prior to that, Dr. Hausmann-Stabile received a Master’s in Psychology from the Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, in Argentina, and a Master’s in Social Work from Fordham University in New York. She is currently completing a NIMH Post-Doctoral Fellowship at the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research at Rutgers University. Dr. Hausmann-Stabile also teaches advanced clinical courses at the Columbia University School of Social Work. Her clinical experience includes working with minority patients in large mental health facilities, and in small community based clinics in New York City and in Argentina.

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