Morning Workshop 1

Guidelines for Developing Cultural Competence Plans

Presented by Peter Guarnaccia, Ph.D.

Description:

This workshop will present guidelines for systematically developing a cultural competence plan for your mental health agency. Based on 5 years experience working with leadership of community agencies on developing cultural competence plans, this workshop will provide an outline for the plan and activities to develop elements of the plan. The workshop will emphasize the creation of cultural competence change teams that will engage all sectors of the agency in developing the cultural competence plan.

Learning Objectives

Participants will:
1. Define cultural competence plans for mental health agencies.
2. Identify the key elements of a cultural competence plan.
3. Understand the role of cultural competence change teams in the plan development process.
4. Work on sections of their cultural competence plan.

Presenter Information

Peter Guarnaccia (Ph. D., Connecticut, 1984) is Professor in the Department of Human Ecology at Cook College and Investigator at the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research. His research interests include cross-cultural patterns of psychiatric disorders, cultural competence in mental health organizations, and processes of cultural and health change among Latino immigrants. He has examined mental health among Latino individuals in the U.S. and in Puerto Rico for two decades, most recently using the National Latino and Asian American (NLAAS) mental health study funded by National Institute of Mental Health. Publications from the NLAAS include “Assessing Diversity among Latinos: Results from the NLAAS” published in the Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences (30:357-378, 2007) and “Ataque de Nervios as a Marker of Social and Psychiatric Vulnerability: Results from the NLASS” published in the International Journal of Social Psychiatry(56:289-309,2010). He was Associate Editor of Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry from 2000-2004 and Co-Editor-in-Chief from 2004-2007. He is co-editor, with Keith Wailoo and Julie Livingston, of A Death Retold: Jesica Santillan, the Bungled Transplant, and Paradoxes of Medical Citizenship, published by the University of North Carolina Press (2006). He has been shifting his research to Mexico, reflected in a recent publication in Ethnic and Racial Studies in 2011 entitled “ ‘We eat meat everyday’: Ecology and economy of dietary change among Oaxacan migrants from Mexico to New Jersey.” He currently directs one of the International Service Learning Programs on Community Health in Oaxaca, Mexico. He is currently working on a grant from NICHD for a study of immigrant students at Rutgers entitled “What Makes Acculturation Successful?”

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